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Medieval Rose Pudding

rose_pudding


Recipe from The Medieval Cookbook by Maggie Black

"Rosee. Take thyk milke; sethe it. Cast thereto sugur, a gode porcioun; pynes, dates ymynced, canel & powdour gynger; and seeth it, and alye it with flours of white rosis, and flour of rys. Cike utl salt it & messe it forth. If thou wilt in stede of almounde milke, take swete crem of kyne."

Translation:

Ingredients:

Petals of one full-blown but unshrivelled white rose
4 level T rice flour or corn flour
1-1/4 C milk or almond milk
2 oz. caster sugar
3/4 t ground cinnamon
3/4 t ground ginger
2-1/2 C single cream
pinch of salt
10 dessert dates, stoned and finely chopped
1 T chopped pine nut kernels

I substituted 3 T rose water for rose petals (roses were 2.99 each at the grocery store!), however, the recipe directs one to remove the rose petals, blanch them in boiling water for two minutes, then press them dry between several sheets of paper towel.

Put the rice flour or corn flour (if you use rose water, you might consider adding extra corn flour; my pudding turned out a bit runny) in a sauce pan and blend enough of the milk (or almond milk) into it to make a smooth cream. Stir in the remaining milk. Place the pan over low heat and stir until the mixture starts to thicken. Put the mixture into a blender and add the sugar, spices, and rose petals. Process until fully blended, then add the cream and salt.

Turn the mixture into a heavy saucepan, and stir over a very low heat, below the boil, until it's the consistency of softly whipped cream. Stir in most of the chopped dates and pine nut kernels, and stir for two minutes more. Turn into a glass or decorative bowl and cool, then chill. Garnish with remaining dates.



Almond Milk

4 oz ground almonds
1-1/4 C water, stock, wine, or other liquid
Rice flour or corn flour
Salt


Pulverize the almonds in a blender or in a coffee or nut mill. Bring the liquid to a boil and pour it on. Leave stand for 10-15 minutes, then rub through a sieve.

Comments

( 25 comments — Leave a comment )
labyrinthyne
Oct. 12th, 2007 04:12 pm (UTC)
!! THIS LOOKS AMAZING.

did it taste as beautiful as you made it look?
jess_faraday
Oct. 12th, 2007 04:27 pm (UTC)
Thanks!

It's very lightly and delicately flavored. I like it a lot.
sparrxw
Oct. 12th, 2007 04:13 pm (UTC)
That looks great!
yeimi
Oct. 12th, 2007 04:15 pm (UTC)
oh wow
subarashiine
Oct. 12th, 2007 04:36 pm (UTC)
That sounds SO interesting! I can't imagine how that would taste :)
Did the book come with "translations" or did you have to do that yourself? (or another source?)
(Deleted comment)
auxoriousrex
Oct. 12th, 2007 04:39 pm (UTC)
man, they could not SPELL back then huh
(Deleted comment)
auxoriousrex
Oct. 12th, 2007 04:43 pm (UTC)
I was joking bb doll.
prosodic
Oct. 12th, 2007 04:40 pm (UTC)
This is one of the coolest posts in this community ever. But then again, I'm a nut for all things medieval. ;)
(Deleted comment)
prosodic
Oct. 12th, 2007 06:46 pm (UTC)
No. Thanks for sharing that!
jess_faraday
Oct. 12th, 2007 09:05 pm (UTC)
Thanks!


I just had to have a cookbook that uses "smyte" and "cleave" regularly.
(Deleted comment)
starrrie
Oct. 12th, 2007 07:01 pm (UTC)
seconded!

synnoveaevael
Oct. 12th, 2007 05:26 pm (UTC)
simply awesome.
heartsarts
Oct. 12th, 2007 05:59 pm (UTC)
wonderful!!!
angevin2
Oct. 12th, 2007 06:25 pm (UTC)
Forme of Cury for the win!

I am even now contemplating what I could substitute for the pine nuts (I am allergic to pine nuts)...
buboniclou
Oct. 12th, 2007 06:29 pm (UTC)
Oh man that looks awesome. What's single cream, btw?
antimony
Oct. 12th, 2007 07:18 pm (UTC)
Assuming you're in the US: light cream. Double cream is slightly fattier than US heavy cream, and I think single cream might also be slightly fattier than light cream, but for a lot of recipes those are equivalent. This looks like the sort of recipe where they would be.
oryxbeisa
Oct. 12th, 2007 09:25 pm (UTC)
oooooo i am obsessed with rose water as an ingredient and would LOVE to try this!
rhondaparrish
Oct. 12th, 2007 10:05 pm (UTC)
That looks gorgeous.
davesslave
Oct. 12th, 2007 10:18 pm (UTC)
That looks spectacular.
langenoire
Oct. 13th, 2007 12:43 am (UTC)
That looks great. Medieval food rocks! But beware of those roses. Unless you have sought out roses grown organically, or for culinary use, they are covered in things you don't want to have in or near your body! Florist's roses are drenched in all manner of things to make them look fresh and lovely.
rachelpage
Oct. 30th, 2014 03:22 am (UTC)
Bright and springlike! Yum!
( 25 comments — Leave a comment )

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